Types of Wood Siding Available for Homeowners

When building your home, even the smallest decision could make a world of difference in what it ultimately looks like. This is also true when undertaking an exterior redesign project. Siding, among other key characteristics, is one of those big decisions that could entirely alter your home’s exterior appeal based on your decision.
Although plastic siding has become a popular option in recent years due to pricing, traditional wood siding remains the preference for many homeowners. This is because wood siding offers customers numerous benefits over their plastic counterparts. Benefits include:

• Wood siding is eco-friendlier than plastic

• Wood is more aesthetically appealing

• Many types of wood are naturally resistant to mold, mildew, and rot, which allows the home owner less maintenance

• Wood lasts longer

• …And much more

One of the main benefits is that wood naturally takes to paint, stains, and other decorative options incredibly well. Plastic, on the other hand, often must be crafted in the customer’s color choice – meaning that options are limited. Once decided upon a type of wood siding, however, you can then choose any type of finish. Whether you want to paint your home the colors of the rainbow, or opt for a natural dark wood stain, anything is possible. Below we look at four of the most commonly used types of siding available: board and batten siding, bevel, tongue and groove, and lap siding. Each has their own aesthetic appeal so that there is something for every person’s unique tastes.

Board and Batten Siding

Board and batten siding is a vertical design created by using two different sized boards. The wider boards are set beneath, while the narrower boards are placed atop the joins. These narrower boards are called ‘battens.’ There are no set widths, so homeowners can choose their preference. The most commonly used measurements, however, are 1 inch by 3 inch battens placed over 1 inch by 10 inch boards.

Bevel Siding

Bevel siding is the most commonly used siding. Installed horizontally, boards are cut at an angle so that one side is thicker than the others. This creates a shingle effect, or the appearance that the boards are overlapping one another. Tongue and Groove Siding Tongue and groove siding is incredibly versatile. Available in both rough and smooth board finishes, it is fitted together tightly to give a sleek appearance. It can be installed in any direction, which does not only include horizontal and vertical, but also diagonal.

Lap Siding

Lap Siding is also known as Channel siding. This siding is very versatile, with installation capabilities for any direction (like the above tongue and groove siding). This unique siding features boards which partially overlap one another, and the ultimate results are a rustic appearance like those of a hunting cabin. If you’re interested in learning even more about wood siding -including less commonly used types available – you can contact your local siding specialist or construction expert. They will be able to give you more detailed information, including a price estimate for your area.

5 Steps to Picking the Perfect Poker Tournament

I wrote this post for a simple reason – I got sick of teaching my friends how to pick a good online poker tournament, so I wrote something I could copy and paste as an email response.

The goal of this page is to help you find the right kind of online poker tournament for you to enter, based on a few different factors. When we say “perfect” tournament, we mean the tourney that’s the most fun and potentially the most profitable that you can afford or have a shot at winning with your skill level.

How to Pick a Poker Tournament
Determining which tournament to play means first figuring out a few things about you and the kind of tournaments you want to play. I think there are basically three kinds of online poker players. Regardless of the specifics of your poker game, you’re probably one of these three broad categories:

The Amateur
This is anyone who plays primarily for fun. Being an amateur doesn’t mean you lose a lot or are a bad player – it means your purpose is more casual. The Amateur probably doesn’t have a tournament bankroll or worry about bankroll management. Amateurs look for tournaments that offer a low fixed buy-in, are exciting to play, and give them a shot at a decent cash prize.

The Cash Game Expert
Players who make a significant amount of money playing ring games of online poker fall under this category. This person might play an occasional tournament, but mostly as a break in the routine. A Cash Game Expert will play a tourney if it gives him a decent shot at a huge cash prize, or if he finds value in the low skill set of a particular tournament’s player field.

The Tournament Junkie
Some of these players are professionals, others are amateurs, but they all have one thing in common. They complete regularly in online poker tournaments. Tournaments make up the majority of their poker play. They keep a tournament bankroll separate from their regular cash game bankroll. In short, tourneys are their wheelhouse.

Five Steps to Picking the Perfect Poker Tournament
Follow these five steps and you’ll have at least one perfect option for your particular style of poker play.

Step One: Figure out what field size you’re interested in.
Do you want to play against dozens of other players, or thousands of them? The name of the game in a tournament is for good players to take money from less-skilled players. That means good players have a higher expectation when they’re playing against fish. That means (generally speaking) a skilled player enjoys a much higher ROI in large tournament fields.

Why would anyone play anything but a massive tournament, if smaller tournaments mean more skilled opponents? Smaller fields mean less variance. Playing against large fields means that you’re more likely to lose every tournament you enter than when you enter tourneys with smaller fields. You earn more consistent winnings if you can compete consistently against smaller (and more skilled) fields of competitors. It’s tournament poker’s most annoying Catch-22.

Step Two: Determine your ideal buy-in.
Amateur players that don’t worry too much about their bankroll should pick a tourney based on the amount they’re comfortable losing in proportion to their skill level. In other words, if you enter a small pool tourney featuring players who are mostly better than you, you should be prepared to lose the entire buy-in. At that point, the tournament’s 100% fun, exactly what amateurs are in it for. All players can follow this rule, since the key to it is that you’re choosing tourneys based on both your skill level and your financial comfort level. It means you won’t be distracted worrying about money, even when it’s down to you vs. the final table.

Step Three: Decide how difficult of a field you want to compete against.
We established in Step Two that it is generally tougher to win tournaments with larger buy-ins, because those tournaments include mostly highly-skilled players. However, this rule has a huge exception.

Tourneys that get a lot of publicity but also happen to have a large buy-in tend to feature people who are playing for the prestige. The best example is the World Series of Poker, where plenty of total amateurs that have no business competing in poker’s biggest event cough up ten grand so they can play in the same tournament as the big boys. Of course, not all examples are this extreme. You’ll often find people playing way out of their league at hefty buy-in online tournaments. It’s all about doing your research.

Step Four: Find your ideal blind structure.
A tourney’s “blind structure” is the number of chips you start with relative to the tourney’s blinds. This structure also lets you know how quickly those blinds increase over time. Amateur players in it mostly for fun and excitement should look for events where they start with a large number of chips and the blinds move up very slowly. This will get them the most bang for their buck. This shallow structure reduces the impact of player skill, at least for a few rounds.

Skilled players need to consider what the strongest part of their poker game is, then pick a structure that matches their abilities. I’d suggest that ring game players choose deep stack tourneys so that the tournament looks and acts like the games they know and love. If you’re used to playing in tournaments, you might like the thrill of the shallow stack setup, and you might be the type of player who makes their best moves in tight game situations.

Step Five: Shop for the best prize structure.
This one is really all about personal preference.

I suggest that you concern yourself mainly with the cut taken by the house. Small stakes online tournaments tend to pay the house 10%. If you’re playing in a tournament with a buy-in above $100, you’ll pay slightly less of a cut to the house. Be careful about entering the super-tiny pool low stakes tournaments online with a rake of 20% or more. When you’re playing with a shallow structure and a huge rake, you’re basically playing the toughest possible online tournament format.

Conclusion
In case you haven’t gotten the point by now – you need to tailor your online poker tourney choice to the specifics of your poker game. It starts with an honest assessment of your abilities and your likes and dislikes when it comes to online poker. If you combine that accurate look at your poker skill with a logical choice of poker tournament, you’ll be giving yourself the best chance of being a tournament winner.

Adding Value to Your Home with A Sunroom

Regardless of where you live, it’s likely that you want to make the most of your home’s outdoor space. Intense climates with scorching summers and freezing winters make it difficult to enjoy being outside. In addition to weather, mosquitos, flies and other pests often send people right back indoors. People are looking for ways to enjoy being outside without its nuisances. Sunrooms are an excellent solution.
The addition of a sunroom to Tennessee homes creates a middle ground between being indoors and outdoors. Though there are variations of each, the two main types of sunrooms are those with glass-paned walls and those with screened walls. Both sun and screen rooms allow you to be outside while offering you varying amounts of protection from insects and weather.

Screen rooms are the most basic and inexpensive form of a sunroom. Built onto decks or porches, the walls of a screen room protect people from insects and other pests. An enclosed roof offers shade from the sun and a cover from the rain, but for the most part, screen rooms are subject to temperatures and weather. While they can’t be temperature controlled, screen rooms can come with electricity for lighting and ceiling fans. Screen rooms are most enjoyed when the weather is comfortable.

Stepping up from a screen room, a traditional glass paned sunroom offers considerably more. Basic sunrooms provide protection from rain, snow and wind and increased protection from temperature. Electricity for ceiling fans and lighting are available as well as full temperature control for higher-end models. Because they are less subject to weather, sunrooms can be enjoyed during more parts of the year.

Like a typical room addition, sunrooms near Knoxville are a construction project. Before anything can begin, a plan must be made and building permits obtained. Once that’s in order, a foundation can be laid, walls put up and roof placed on top. With the installation completed, sun and screen rooms become a permanent addition to a home.

Whether you opt for a simple screened version or an advanced glass paned one, sunrooms are a great addition to any home. Every sunroom adds valuable and usable living space to a home. Sunrooms make excellent home offices, game rooms or art studios. The natural light of the sun with protection from insects and weather make sunrooms the perfect place to entertain guests, enjoy breakfast, or simply kick back relax.